The Execution Problem

Last June, I had the privilege of attending the national SHRM conference in DC. My goal for attending was to 1. Step out of my comfort zone & actually meet people. I joined a Facebook Group for attendees and reached out to my Twitter friends to be sure we got to me IRL.

My second goal was to come away with at least one action item. At a conference like SHRM with 25,000+ attendees and hundreds of options for sessions, it can be overwhelming as the fire hose of information continually hits you.

I went to a variety of leadership and culture related sessions as we are working on culture in my department. I walked into “9 Minutes in Monday: the Quick & Easy Way to turn Managers into Leaders” late and almost immediately got lost in my own thoughts. I was tired and thought about how the speaker James Robbins wasn’t telling us anything we had heard before. Then Mr Robbins made a comment that made me stop & listen: he admitted that we have heard this all before so we “don’t have a knowledge problem; we have an execution problem.” Woah. Yeah. That’s it!

The one tidbit, one light bulb making the conference worthwhile. I’ve taken this to heart and used it many times when looking to motivate myself and to get myself to stop complaining. It’s a good reminder that complaining doesn’t do a lot of good without finding a solution.

I used this as my stepping stone to begin working to bring DisruptHR to Brookings, to take on a different role at BAHRA, to encourage others to do the same.

I need this reminder again, especially in the office. It’s so easy to slip into the habit of complaining for the sake of complaining, blaming the “powers that be” for decisions. I need to look for solutions and bring that to the table and not wait for others. And then execute!

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